Free Shipping on All Subscriptions Worldwide
0

Your Cart is Empty

Review: Hato Sabure Cookies

by Shigeki Abe November 13, 2014 7 Comments

Hato Sabure (鳩サブレー) is a very popular cookie from Kamakura, Japan. The store, Teshimaya (豊島屋), which makes the cookies has been open since the Meiji period (1868) when western goods started to flow into Japan. Kyujiro Kubota, the first owner of Teshimaya , was able to get a hold of European biscuits and decided to try and make some himself. The cookies are very simple because at the time the primary ingredient, butter, was extremely hard to get a hold of in Japan and Kyujiro wanted to accentuate the light butter flavor.

Current original store location in Kamakura. There are many stores like this one, located through out Japan.

So where did the name Hato Sabure (鳩サブレー) come from? Hato (鳩) means dove, and the most famous shrines in Kamakura, the Tsurugaoka Hachimangu (鶴岡八幡宮), has the character for “hachi” (八) shaped to look like a dove so Kyujiro decided to make his cookies in the shape of a dove to honor the shrine. Sable is a French word for butter cookie and once translated into Japanese, the pronunciation became similar to the common boy’s name “Saburo” (三郎). It is said that the store owner, Kyujiro, even became known around town as “Hato Saburo” (Dove Saburo) after the success of his cookies.

Character for Hato (dove)

 

Logo of the store

Let’s get to what really matters; how are the cookies. 

Packaging: Like all Japanese things, the packaging is nicely done. The box that I got came in a small cardboard box shaped like a bag, so it had a handle which made it easy to carry around. Inside, there were four individually wrapped cookies with perfectly displayed dove shaped cookies in clear wrappers, making it look very appetizing. Each cookie is a little over $1 and while I got a pack of 4, you can buy them individually or get a larger package.

Taste: The moment you open the package, you instantly get the smell of freshly baked cookies. The texture of the cookie is one of the highlights as it has the right amount of crispiness and crumbliness (is that a word?) albeit a bit more on the crispier side. It has a gentle and light texture and leaves no oily residue on your hands. Flavor wise, it’s simple and uncomplicated, yet tasty. It’s not as sweet or buttery as many short-bread cookies that you might find in the States, as it’s much lighter but personally I prefer that.

I felt bad biting into the cookie and eating the head of the dove

TLDR: Simple, light butter short-bread cookies with great packaging and crispy texture. Worth getting, but might be slightly overhyped due to its history.

Shigeki Abe
Shigeki Abe

Founder of Snakku; Born in Tokyo and raised in New York, Shigeki has always traveled and explored the world through food.


7 Responses

Shigeki from Snakku
Shigeki from Snakku

October 03, 2016

@Leigh
These cookies are unfortunately not available outside of Japan. We were able to get a bunch and include them in our previous Snakku box. While we’re currently out of them, we do hope to include them in our future boxes so definitely keep an eye out! If you are in Japan though, you can get these cookies at their original store in Kamakura or at some department stores in Tokyo.

leigh brown
leigh brown

September 17, 2016

I have been looking all over for this cookie and I found them but don’t know how to buy them. Can any one help???

Shigeki from Snakku
Shigeki from Snakku

March 06, 2016

Hi everyone! We hope to offer these Hato Sabure cookies in one of our upcoming subscriptions :)
We’re also in the midst of building out our store so you can get the snacks individual. Definitely sign up for the newsletter and keep an eye out for updates!

Melanie
Melanie

March 04, 2016

I have been longing for these cookies since I left Japan in 1970 at age 10. We lived in Zushi and I would bicycle to Kamakura. I first received these as a present from a dear friend on Girl’s day. How can I get some now that I am in the States??

Pamela
Pamela

November 17, 2015

May I know how or where I can buy these cookies? Maybe a website for online delivery?

Vitoria
Vitoria

May 26, 2015

These cookies are betifuaul, Karin! I wish I was your neighbor. :) Whenever I made sugar cookies with my mom and grandma, we always took such a long time to make sure they looked betifuaul.The little details are so important.

Michele
Michele

May 05, 2015

Hi! I live in Hawaii and would like to know if anyone would ship the Hato Sabure?

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Blog

Hedonist Monkeys and Ninja Schools

by Shigeki Abe December 02, 2016

Travel to Nagano

Nagano is not often spoken of as a primary tourist destination in Japan. But a couple of notable claims-to-fame make Nagano a very interesting place to visit indeed.

Read More
Shichi Go San: A Celebration of Youth

by Ryosuke Wada November 12, 2016

japan shichi-go-san

Dive into the history and origins of the Japanese celebration, "Shichi-go-san," which is still celebrated today in the month of November!

Read More
Unwrapping the Secret Behind The Art of Gift Giving in Japan

by Shigeki Abe September 24, 2016

Guide to Furoshiki
Did you know Japanese people actually consider the presentation of a gift or product just as important as what’s inside? See how you can use a furoshiki to spruce up your gift packaging!
Read More
Become an Insider

Sign up to get the latest scoop on giveaways, Japan travel tips, and more!